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TWO MORE EVENTS START AT W.S.O.P. (Update)
2011-06-22

Poker's most prestigious tournament continues to pack 'em in
27 survivors from a starting pack of 3,144 gathered Tuesday for the third and hopefully last day of event 34: $1,000 No-Limit Hold'em, with Michael Souza leading the hunt for the bracelet and the $488,283 that this competition awards the winner. Souza started the day comfortably ahead of nearest rival Rob Verspui as the only other player above the 600 000 chip mark.
Mark Schmid had a 200 000 chip lead on Trevor Vanderveen, Justin Cohen, Robbie Verspui, Benjamin Volpe, Andrew Rudnik and Jonathan Clancy as the last 7 players fought it out Tuesday evening Vegas time, with the first four players all holding over a million chips apiece at the start of level 27.
The second day of event 35: $5,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Six-Handed commenced Tuesday with 105 players surviving an initial first day field of 507, and notable names like Vanessa Selbst (chip leader), Eric Lindgren, Shaun Deeb, Mike "timex" McDonald, and Gregory Brooks still very much in contention, along with David “Devilfish” Ulliott, Joe Hachem, Brian Rast, Layne Flack, Andy Seth, Jeff Lisandro, Jason Mercier, Chance Kornuth, and the always exciting Tom Dwan.
There's a good reward of $548,095 attached to this new event, together with a coveted WSOP bracelet.
By level 18 on Tuesday evening the field was down to 21 players with the top ten chip counts held (in order) by Gregory Brooks (725,000), Erick Lindgren (500,000), Vanessa Selbst (485,000), Joseph Ressler (435,000), Tom Dwan (400,000), Michael McDonald (380,000), Jared Bleznick (340,000) Steven Merrifield (320,000) Jason Mercier (315,000) and Peter Jetten (315 000).
Clearly there is a lot more action in store in this event.
Event 36: $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em launched Tuesday with a field lower than that achieved last year; only 1,734 signed up for the 2011 competition, nevertheless creating a major prize pool of $3.94 million.
The registration list showed an eclectic mix of amateurs, celebrities and professional players that included Ludovic Lacay, Shannon Shorr, Jeff Williams, Scott Montgomery, Jordan Young, Beth Shak, Brad Garrett, Vivek Rajkumar, Lars Bonding, Eric Baldwin, David Pham, Andre Akkari, Alex Gomes, La Sengphet, Erica Schoenberg, Jason Somerville, Dan Fleyshman, Joe Cada, and Jonathan Duhamel.
Playing into Tuesday night the field was down to 490 at level 9, with Chance Kornuth holding a 25 000 chip lead over his closest adversary but many ace players still in the running.
Event 37: $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Championship also kicked off Tuesday with a star-studded entry field of 240 (one player less than signed up for the event last year) generating a prize pool of $2.25 million.
This competition is the final mixed game championship of the 2011 Series, attracting many pros anxious to show off their skills in a range of games as well as earn some money and a bracelet.
Late evening Tuesday Vegas time saw the action reach level 6 with Eugene Katchalov leading on 64,000, with Jimmy Fricke and Andrew Barber biting his heels on 63,000 apiece, and a slew of top players still in a remaining field of 238.




ONLINE POKER COMPANY EXTENDS FRENCH FOOTBALL SPONSORSHIP
2011-05-06

Everest Poker and Olympique Lyonnais NFL Odds sign on for another two years
Online poker company Everest Poker.fr has announced a two year extension to its sponsorship agreement with French football team Olympique Lyonnais, unveiling a new red, white and blue team shirt this week.
Olympique Lyonnais is one of the most successful clubs in Europe, having won seven consecutive domestic titles beginning in 2002.
Everest's original agreement with the club was inked in mid-2010.
The new shirt will debut at the Stade Gerland on May 8, when Olympique Lyonnais clashes with Olympique de Marseille. Thereafter it will be worn during all home games played in League 1 and League Cup from next season.
Everest will be arranging OL Poker Cup events and tournaments for supporters of Olympique Lyonnais, with VIP tickets to OL matches on the prize list.


CAESAR'S CEO SPEAKS UP FOR ONLINE POKER LEGALISATION
2011-04-27

But Loveman insists on a federal solution, and it only embraces poker
Achieving wide coverage that included major newspapers, CNN Money, Fortune magazine and Associated Press articles this week was an op-ed article written by Caesars Entertainment CEO Gary Loveman, supporting the idea of legalised online poker in the USA through the federal rather than individual state route.
The piece was prompted by the recent enforcement actions against major online poker sites (see previous InfoPowa reports), which Loveman sees as an opportunity for the United States to fully
legalise and regulate the $6 billion industry...but the tone of the article suggests that he's focused particularly on internet poker.
“Only federal legislation can clear up the current ambiguities in U.S. law and crack down on other online gambling like sports betting and casino games,” Loveman wrote.
Loveman appears to share the controversial US Department of Justice view that internet poker is expressly illegal in the United States, asserting: "Online poker is currently illegal in the U.S. and, as a result, the $6 billion industry has developed overseas, catering to the wishes of millions of Americans playing from their homes in Ohio, California, Mississippi and every other state. That's crazy."
But the land gambling executive points out that legal actions against PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker and Absolute Poker won’t change whether millions of Americans want to play online poker.
“Instead, the question is this: Should we seize the moment to legalize online poker, permit a safe and legitimate industry in the U.S., and bring these jobs and revenues home?” Loveman wrote.

“Unequivocally, the answer is yes.”

Associated Press noted that Caesars has long espoused the need to regulate and tax online gambling, and that Loveman’s comments are the first public statements about the indictments from the company that owns the World Series of Poker.

In his piece, Loveman compares the current US market enforcement moves to alcohol prohibition in the 1920s, saying adults are being hamstrung by a law keeping them from activities they consider appropriate.
“Business is being diverted from legitimate, respected companies that employ thousands of people to fly-by-night, underground (and in this case, foreign) operations,” Loveman said in his article, titled "Online Poker - Legalize It.”
"Just like Prohibition, consumers lose all of the protections that come with a government-regulated onshore business. And millions of otherwise law-abiding adult Americans are hamstrung by a law they disrespect and consider to be a barrier to a perfectly appropriate activity," he warns.
Loveman claims that the latest Department of Justice actions have created a unique opportunity to "...bring thousands of jobs home to America, to generate revenues that benefit Americans rather than foreign companies and to bring clarity to the current ambiguous set of federal laws.”
And he recommends: “We should seize the moment."
He adds: "The question we face isn't "will there be online poker?" Millions of Americans have already answered that question through their regular play, and the latest indictments won't change that. In fact, less than 24 hours after the three poker sites were closed, other foreign operators began filling the void."

Turning to the mechanics of regulation, Loveman emphasises the need for a federal solution, saying: "Unfortunately, however well-intentioned it may be, state level legislation will not adequately address the problems that currently exist.
"The goals of legislation are simple: let Americans play online poker in the privacy of their homes, and create jobs and revenues here in America. Only federal legislation can accomplish that, by creating a well-regulated system of online poker. And only federal legislation can clear up the current ambiguities in U.S. law and crack down on other online gambling like sports betting and casino games."
Loveman goes on to detail the generally accepted requirements for sound regulation, covering fair gaming, problem gambling and under-age precautions, financial probity, measures to guard against criminal involvement, money laundering and cheating, and shielding the privacy of players.
"In short, this bill should recognize the reality of the world we live in....And it should acknowledge that as a game of skill, poker deserves to be treated differently than other forms of gambling," Loveman opines.
He optimistically concludes: "One day, we'll look back at 2011 and laugh at the folly of a ban on Internet poker -- just like we now think about Prohibition. The sooner that day comes, the better."